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In Zurich for Manifesta 11, Swans Learn How to Duke

The world is in turmoil. There is an insane amount of violence. Political campaigns seem to go on forever, supercharging and poisoning social discourse.

It's difficult to find relief. Getting out of your routine and traveling the world is one of the great ways to change perspective and rekindle your love of life. 

When I was in Switzerland I had some great experiences that transported me away from all the stress. 

One particular moment stayed with me. When I was in Zurich, I was walking around the city. 
On the bank of the lake, the guide wanted us to see one of the Manifesta 11 installations. A bienniall European festival of contemporary art, Manifesta this year had as its topic "What People Do For Money." 
Some of the installations were small. Some were large. 
The one on the lake was an intimate amphitheater built onto a floating pier. Short films were screened that documented what people do for work. A small cafe/bar served drinks and snacks. The setting was very pleasant. When we visited, a short film documented firemen demonstrating fire fighting techniques. 
Leaving the amphitheater I noticed that a narrow bridge had been built from the shore to the floating pier. That bridge covered a watery path that water fowl use as they swim from Zurich Lake to the Limmat River. For the swans to pass under the bridge, they had to lower their necks. I know it's silly, but thinking that the swans had to learn how to duck struck me as really funny. 





‪#‎InLoveWithSwitzerland‬
‪#‎VisitZurich‬

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