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Lost and Found in Tokyo


I am staying at the Lost in Translation Park Hyatt Tokyo, a beautifully sleek and elegant hotel.

The trip is crazy-short. Only one day in Tokyo, then a bullet train trip to Kyoto. Three days there, then back to Tokyo to return to LA.

Nutty and such great fun.

After the flight from Los Angeles, I had dinner at Kozue, the hotel's formal Japanese restaurant with floor to ceiling windows with a view the Tokyo skyline.

The tasting menu had 28 "things" to taste that covered raw, grilled and simmered.

Here are some photographs from the dinner.








The beef was amazingly delicate and melt-in-the-mouth tender. 

The soups had clear broths, refreshing to the palate and rejuvenating for a tired traveler. 

Salt pickled vegetables were simple and clean tasting.

Soba with duck broth and leeks, delicious.

The portions start small to accompany cocktails and a small tasting of sake. Then the dishes build in complexity and size with the rice dishes, including a wonderfully subtle rice with claims for the end because rice is filling.

A wonderful meal to begin my introduction to Japan!.

More to come.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Where did you stay in Kyoto?
David Latt said…
We stayed at the Park Hyatt Tokyo, the hotel used in the film, Lost in Translation.

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